Europe

tsparks via liquidnight / posted on 11 November 2011

liquidnight:

André Kertész
Boulevard de la Madeleine
Paris, 1927
From André Kertész (Editions Hazan)

1920’s Streetscape… very nice.  

Kertész left Hungary in 1925 and moved to Paris, in 1936 he moved on to New York. When WWII broke it was not possible for him to return to Europe. Kertész did not find critical success till then end of his life, now he is considered a 20th century master photographer.

liquidnight:

André Kertész

Boulevard de la Madeleine

Paris, 1927

From André Kertész (Editions Hazan)

1920’s Streetscape… very nice. Kertész left Hungary in 1925 and moved to Paris, in 1936 he moved on to New York. When WWII broke it was not possible for him to return to Europe. Kertész did not find critical success till then end of his life, now he is considered a 20th century master photographer.

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TAGS: Vintage Black and white Street Photography Art Cityscape Portrait André Kertész Paris France 1920s City Urban Life Boulevard de la Madeleine Monochrome Photograph Europe Sidewalk Wall Posters Old Elderly Person Figure Bags Baggage Burden Carry Walk

tsparks via thepoliticalnotebook / posted on 21 May 2011

thepoliticalnotebook:

Masses of Spanish protesters defy a government curfew banning protests after midnight. Tens of thousands of demonstrators remained in the streets, angry over government financial decisions. The Puerta del Sol square in Madrid, pictured above, has been a centre for these outcries and mass demonstrations of anger at the Spanish government and the flailing economy.  Foreign Policy  quoted Ignacio Escolar of Público newspaper as saying”

“Is it really necessary to explain the causes? Is anyone really surprised that in a country that claims to be European, that presumes to sit at the table with the G-20, that only recently claimed to be the seventh largest economic power on the planet, protests erupt when youth unemployment is at 45 percent?”

Spain’s overall jobless rate for the whole working population is 21.3 percent, the Eurozone’s highest. Most of those who do hold a job earn less than 1,000 Euros per month, known as “mileuristas” or “1000 euro-ers.”
Read more at Foreign Policy and the Daily Mail. 
Above: Madrid’s Puerta del Sol square is filled with thousands of people, via the Daily Mail.

thepoliticalnotebook:

Masses of Spanish protesters defy a government curfew banning protests after midnight. Tens of thousands of demonstrators remained in the streets, angry over government financial decisions. The Puerta del Sol square in Madrid, pictured above, has been a centre for these outcries and mass demonstrations of anger at the Spanish government and the flailing economy.  Foreign Policy  quoted Ignacio Escolar of Público newspaper as saying”

“Is it really necessary to explain the causes? Is anyone really surprised that in a country that claims to be European, that presumes to sit at the table with the G-20, that only recently claimed to be the seventh largest economic power on the planet, protests erupt when youth unemployment is at 45 percent?”

Spain’s overall jobless rate for the whole working population is 21.3 percent, the Eurozone’s highest. Most of those who do hold a job earn less than 1,000 Euros per month, known as “mileuristas” or “1000 euro-ers.”

Read more at Foreign Policy and the Daily Mail. 

Above: Madrid’s Puerta del Sol square is filled with thousands of people, via the Daily Mail.

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TAGS: News spain protests europe EU eurozone budget crisis budget politics europe spring si se puede

tsparks / posted on 7 June 2009

Pirate Party Wins and Enters The European Parliament

Read about Pirate Party here.

The Pirate Party has won a huge victory in the Swedish elections and is marching on to Brussels. After months of campaigning against well established parties, the Pirate Party has gathered enough votes to be guaranteed a seat in the European Parliament.

When the Swedish Pirate Party was founded in early 2006, the majority of the mainstream press were skeptical, with some simply laughing it away. But they were wrong to dismiss this political movement out of hand. Today, the Pirate Party accomplished what some believed to be the impossible, by securing a seat in the European Parliament.

With 99.9% of the districts counted the Pirates have 7.1 percent of the votes, beating several established parties. This means that the Pirate Party will get at least one, but most likely two of the 18 (+2) available seats Sweden has at the European Parliament.
Via: Torrent Freak
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TAGS: politics europe